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Barry Harris

About Barry Harris

A solid, deeply swinging pianist, Barry Harris has been an important presence on the jazz scene since the 1960s. His solo output has been small but consistent; between 1960 and 1962, he recorded three excellent piano trio albums with three different but equally masterful rhythm sections. Though he's written many tunes, Harris enjoys playing Bop standards. His recordings draw from the songbooks of Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, and Thelonious Monk, as well as older material such as “I Should Care” and “What is this Thing Called Love.” Harris' playing falls solidly within the Bop tradition; however, his slower, more deliberate pace and gentler attack distinguishes him from fellow jazz pianist Bud Powell. Furthermore, Harris' rhythmic explorations bear Monk's influence without lapsing into imitation. Harris has played in both solo settings and larger ensembles, and has enjoyed a prolific career as a sideman.

Listen toBarry Harrison Rhapsody

A solid, deeply swinging pianist, Barry Harris has been an important presence on the jazz scene since the 1960s. His solo output has been small but consistent; between 1960 and 1962, he recorded three excellent piano trio albums with three different but equally masterful rhythm sections. Though he's written many tunes, Harris enjoys playing Bop standards. His recordings draw from the songbooks of Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, and Thelonious Monk, as well as older material such as “I Should Care” and “What is this Thing Called Love.” Harris' playing falls solidly within the Bop tradition; however, his slower, more deliberate pace and gentler attack distinguishes him from fellow jazz pianist Bud Powell. Furthermore, Harris' rhythmic explorations bear Monk's influence without lapsing into imitation. Harris has played in both solo settings and larger ensembles, and has enjoyed a prolific career as a sideman.

About Barry Harris

A solid, deeply swinging pianist, Barry Harris has been an important presence on the jazz scene since the 1960s. His solo output has been small but consistent; between 1960 and 1962, he recorded three excellent piano trio albums with three different but equally masterful rhythm sections. Though he's written many tunes, Harris enjoys playing Bop standards. His recordings draw from the songbooks of Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, and Thelonious Monk, as well as older material such as “I Should Care” and “What is this Thing Called Love.” Harris' playing falls solidly within the Bop tradition; however, his slower, more deliberate pace and gentler attack distinguishes him from fellow jazz pianist Bud Powell. Furthermore, Harris' rhythmic explorations bear Monk's influence without lapsing into imitation. Harris has played in both solo settings and larger ensembles, and has enjoyed a prolific career as a sideman.

About Barry Harris

A solid, deeply swinging pianist, Barry Harris has been an important presence on the jazz scene since the 1960s. His solo output has been small but consistent; between 1960 and 1962, he recorded three excellent piano trio albums with three different but equally masterful rhythm sections. Though he's written many tunes, Harris enjoys playing Bop standards. His recordings draw from the songbooks of Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, and Thelonious Monk, as well as older material such as “I Should Care” and “What is this Thing Called Love.” Harris' playing falls solidly within the Bop tradition; however, his slower, more deliberate pace and gentler attack distinguishes him from fellow jazz pianist Bud Powell. Furthermore, Harris' rhythmic explorations bear Monk's influence without lapsing into imitation. Harris has played in both solo settings and larger ensembles, and has enjoyed a prolific career as a sideman.