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Christian aTunde Adjuah

by Christian Scott

Christian aTunde Adjuah by Christian Scott

Listen to

Christian aTunde Adjuah

by Christian Scott

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Released:
Label: Concord Jazz
Here's a politically minded statement record, which isn't to say that it forgets to entertain. Complete with nods to the bandleader's African heritage, the sonic wallop of contemporary black pop, and the trumpet-balladeer tradition going back to Miles, this 23-song tour de force can be both sermonizer and seducer. The Trayvon Martin/Marissa Alexander joint tribute, "When Marissa Stands Her Ground," isn't afraid to give vulnerability its due, while "New New Orleans (King Adjuah Stomp)" makes good on its parenthetical promise. Who said jazzers couldn't make important double-albums anymore?

About This Album

Here's a politically minded statement record, which isn't to say that it forgets to entertain. Complete with nods to the bandleader's African heritage, the sonic wallop of contemporary black pop, and the trumpet-balladeer tradition going back to Miles, this 23-song tour de force can be both sermonizer and seducer. The Trayvon Martin/Marissa Alexander joint tribute, "When Marissa Stands Her Ground," isn't afraid to give vulnerability its due, while "New New Orleans (King Adjuah Stomp)" makes good on its parenthetical promise. Who said jazzers couldn't make important double-albums anymore?

Songs

About This Album

Here's a politically minded statement record, which isn't to say that it forgets to entertain. Complete with nods to the bandleader's African heritage, the sonic wallop of contemporary black pop, and the trumpet-balladeer tradition going back to Miles, this 23-song tour de force can be both sermonizer and seducer. The Trayvon Martin/Marissa Alexander joint tribute, "When Marissa Stands Her Ground," isn't afraid to give vulnerability its due, while "New New Orleans (King Adjuah Stomp)" makes good on its parenthetical promise. Who said jazzers couldn't make important double-albums anymore?