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Softly As I Leave You

by Frank Sinatra

Softly As I Leave You by Frank Sinatra

Listen to

Softly As I Leave You

by Frank Sinatra

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Released:
Label: Frank Sinatra Enterprises
When the Nashville-style title track became a hit single, Reprise grabbed a bunch of Sinatra's movie themes, singles and rarities and put out this ragtag collection. "Here's to the Losers" and the movie themes "Emily" and "Come Blow Your Horn" quickly became fan favorites; Sinatra's bittersweet reading of Johnny Mercer's "Talk to Me Baby" deserved the same fate. Many of the tunes show Sinatra trying to get into the country/rock singles market, but "The Look of Love" (not the Burt Bacharach number) shows how much more natural Frank sounded in a breezier jazz style. Overall, this plays like an artist at war with the pop era he suddenly finds himself in.

About This Album

When the Nashville-style title track became a hit single, Reprise grabbed a bunch of Sinatra's movie themes, singles and rarities and put out this ragtag collection. "Here's to the Losers" and the movie themes "Emily" and "Come Blow Your Horn" quickly became fan favorites; Sinatra's bittersweet reading of Johnny Mercer's "Talk to Me Baby" deserved the same fate. Many of the tunes show Sinatra trying to get into the country/rock singles market, but "The Look of Love" (not the Burt Bacharach number) shows how much more natural Frank sounded in a breezier jazz style. Overall, this plays like an artist at war with the pop era he suddenly finds himself in.

Songs

About This Album

When the Nashville-style title track became a hit single, Reprise grabbed a bunch of Sinatra's movie themes, singles and rarities and put out this ragtag collection. "Here's to the Losers" and the movie themes "Emily" and "Come Blow Your Horn" quickly became fan favorites; Sinatra's bittersweet reading of Johnny Mercer's "Talk to Me Baby" deserved the same fate. Many of the tunes show Sinatra trying to get into the country/rock singles market, but "The Look of Love" (not the Burt Bacharach number) shows how much more natural Frank sounded in a breezier jazz style. Overall, this plays like an artist at war with the pop era he suddenly finds himself in.