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About Hawaiian Style Band

Emerging from the relative musical drought of the 1980s, this non-native born trio took island music in a new direction, favoring loose, pop-reggae rhythms over the neo-traditional sound that had dominated the '70s. Their music struck a chord with locals, in part because the group conceived of itself as an open, evolving entity dedicated to showcasing local talent. During the band's short life, they invited over 50 collaborators into the group, from Israel Kamakawiwa'ole and the Pahinui Brothers to other, smaller-name local talent.

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Ooklah The Moc

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Listen toHawaiian Style Bandon Rhapsody

Emerging from the relative musical drought of the 1980s, this non-native born trio took island music in a new direction, favoring loose, pop-reggae rhythms over the neo-traditional sound that had dominated the '70s. Their music struck a chord with locals, in part because the group conceived of itself as an open, evolving entity dedicated to showcasing local talent. During the band's short life, they invited over 50 collaborators into the group, from Israel Kamakawiwa'ole and the Pahinui Brothers to other, smaller-name local talent.

About Hawaiian Style Band

Emerging from the relative musical drought of the 1980s, this non-native born trio took island music in a new direction, favoring loose, pop-reggae rhythms over the neo-traditional sound that had dominated the '70s. Their music struck a chord with locals, in part because the group conceived of itself as an open, evolving entity dedicated to showcasing local talent. During the band's short life, they invited over 50 collaborators into the group, from Israel Kamakawiwa'ole and the Pahinui Brothers to other, smaller-name local talent.

Similar Artists

About Hawaiian Style Band

Emerging from the relative musical drought of the 1980s, this non-native born trio took island music in a new direction, favoring loose, pop-reggae rhythms over the neo-traditional sound that had dominated the '70s. Their music struck a chord with locals, in part because the group conceived of itself as an open, evolving entity dedicated to showcasing local talent. During the band's short life, they invited over 50 collaborators into the group, from Israel Kamakawiwa'ole and the Pahinui Brothers to other, smaller-name local talent.

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