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Lifer

About Lifer

A five man crew from Pennsylvania, Lifer got their start as a cover band who won an MTV contest for their rendition of Limp Bizkit's "Nookie." Now performing all original material, Lifer lay down heavy guitar riffs and raucous drum fills, peppered with occasional token turntable action. Lyrically, they switch between melodramatic, tormented artist vocals a la Creed (and/or the mid-'90s grunge heads that came before Creed) and the attitude-laden shout-rapping preferred by Fred Durst and co.

Listen toLiferon Rhapsody

A five man crew from Pennsylvania, Lifer got their start as a cover band who won an MTV contest for their rendition of Limp Bizkit's "Nookie." Now performing all original material, Lifer lay down heavy guitar riffs and raucous drum fills, peppered with occasional token turntable action. Lyrically, they switch between melodramatic, tormented artist vocals a la Creed (and/or the mid-'90s grunge heads that came before Creed) and the attitude-laden shout-rapping preferred by Fred Durst and co.

About Lifer

A five man crew from Pennsylvania, Lifer got their start as a cover band who won an MTV contest for their rendition of Limp Bizkit's "Nookie." Now performing all original material, Lifer lay down heavy guitar riffs and raucous drum fills, peppered with occasional token turntable action. Lyrically, they switch between melodramatic, tormented artist vocals a la Creed (and/or the mid-'90s grunge heads that came before Creed) and the attitude-laden shout-rapping preferred by Fred Durst and co.

About Lifer

A five man crew from Pennsylvania, Lifer got their start as a cover band who won an MTV contest for their rendition of Limp Bizkit's "Nookie." Now performing all original material, Lifer lay down heavy guitar riffs and raucous drum fills, peppered with occasional token turntable action. Lyrically, they switch between melodramatic, tormented artist vocals a la Creed (and/or the mid-'90s grunge heads that came before Creed) and the attitude-laden shout-rapping preferred by Fred Durst and co.