×
Rhapsody App for
Rhapsody International Inc.

Listen toPhantom Planeton Rhapsody

Phantom Planet
}

About Phantom Planet

If the great teen fashion magazine Sassy were still around today, the monthly "Cute Band Alert" would most certainly be repeatedly awarded to Phantom Planet. With members including Jason Schwartzman (from Rushmore) and one Gap model, the band manage to engage in a brand of edgy alt-pop that is both charming and commercial-friendly. Taking melodies from the '60s songbook and adding a distinct FM whitewash, they're currently storming TV and movie soundtracks as well as eliciting glances from your girlfriend.

Listen toPhantom Planeton Rhapsody

If the great teen fashion magazine Sassy were still around today, the monthly "Cute Band Alert" would most certainly be repeatedly awarded to Phantom Planet. With members including Jason Schwartzman (from Rushmore) and one Gap model, the band manage to engage in a brand of edgy alt-pop that is both charming and commercial-friendly. Taking melodies from the '60s songbook and adding a distinct FM whitewash, they're currently storming TV and movie soundtracks as well as eliciting glances from your girlfriend.

About Phantom Planet

If the great teen fashion magazine Sassy were still around today, the monthly "Cute Band Alert" would most certainly be repeatedly awarded to Phantom Planet. With members including Jason Schwartzman (from Rushmore) and one Gap model, the band manage to engage in a brand of edgy alt-pop that is both charming and commercial-friendly. Taking melodies from the '60s songbook and adding a distinct FM whitewash, they're currently storming TV and movie soundtracks as well as eliciting glances from your girlfriend.

About Phantom Planet

If the great teen fashion magazine Sassy were still around today, the monthly "Cute Band Alert" would most certainly be repeatedly awarded to Phantom Planet. With members including Jason Schwartzman (from Rushmore) and one Gap model, the band manage to engage in a brand of edgy alt-pop that is both charming and commercial-friendly. Taking melodies from the '60s songbook and adding a distinct FM whitewash, they're currently storming TV and movie soundtracks as well as eliciting glances from your girlfriend.