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About Ray Parker Jr.

Though his name is practically synonymous with the phrase "I ain't afraid of no ghost," Ray Parker Jr.'s career is far deeper than his smash 1984 single "Ghostbusters." While still a teenager in the 1960s, Ray was an in-demand session guitarist, playing on records by 100 Proof, Aged In Soul and the Spinners, among others. In the early '70s he hooked up with Stevie Wonder, joining him for a tour (with the Rolling Stones) and playing on classic albums like Innervisions and Talking Book. Later in the decade, he headed the group Raydio, and released three quality LPs while racking up several top 10 hits, including "Jack and Jill" and "A Woman Needs Love (Just Like You Do)." He release solo albums in the early '80s, topping the R&B charts with The Other Woman in 1982. "Ghostbusters" hit the scene two years later, which became a gigantic crossover hit and made Ray Parker Jr. a household name. Unfortunately, the song was extremely similar to Huey Lewis' single "I Want A New Drug," which led to a lawsuit and out-of-court payoff. He continued to record throughout the '80s but the well of hits had dried up. In 2006 he returned with a new album, I'm Free.

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Listen toRay Parker Jr.on Rhapsody

Though his name is practically synonymous with the phrase "I ain't afraid of no ghost," Ray Parker Jr.'s career is far deeper than his smash 1984 single "Ghostbusters." While still a teenager in the 1960s, Ray was an in-demand session guitarist, playing on records by 100 Proof, Aged In Soul and the Spinners, among others. In the early '70s he hooked up with Stevie Wonder, joining him for a tour (with the Rolling Stones) and playing on classic albums like Innervisions and Talking Book. Later in the decade, he headed the group Raydio, and released three quality LPs while racking up several top 10 hits, including "Jack and Jill" and "A Woman Needs Love (Just Like You Do)." He release solo albums in the early '80s, topping the R&B charts with The Other Woman in 1982. "Ghostbusters" hit the scene two years later, which became a gigantic crossover hit and made Ray Parker Jr. a household name. Unfortunately, the song was extremely similar to Huey Lewis' single "I Want A New Drug," which led to a lawsuit and out-of-court payoff. He continued to record throughout the '80s but the well of hits had dried up. In 2006 he returned with a new album, I'm Free.

About Ray Parker Jr.

Though his name is practically synonymous with the phrase "I ain't afraid of no ghost," Ray Parker Jr.'s career is far deeper than his smash 1984 single "Ghostbusters." While still a teenager in the 1960s, Ray was an in-demand session guitarist, playing on records by 100 Proof, Aged In Soul and the Spinners, among others. In the early '70s he hooked up with Stevie Wonder, joining him for a tour (with the Rolling Stones) and playing on classic albums like Innervisions and Talking Book. Later in the decade, he headed the group Raydio, and released three quality LPs while racking up several top 10 hits, including "Jack and Jill" and "A Woman Needs Love (Just Like You Do)." He release solo albums in the early '80s, topping the R&B charts with The Other Woman in 1982. "Ghostbusters" hit the scene two years later, which became a gigantic crossover hit and made Ray Parker Jr. a household name. Unfortunately, the song was extremely similar to Huey Lewis' single "I Want A New Drug," which led to a lawsuit and out-of-court payoff. He continued to record throughout the '80s but the well of hits had dried up. In 2006 he returned with a new album, I'm Free.

About Ray Parker Jr.

Though his name is practically synonymous with the phrase "I ain't afraid of no ghost," Ray Parker Jr.'s career is far deeper than his smash 1984 single "Ghostbusters." While still a teenager in the 1960s, Ray was an in-demand session guitarist, playing on records by 100 Proof, Aged In Soul and the Spinners, among others. In the early '70s he hooked up with Stevie Wonder, joining him for a tour (with the Rolling Stones) and playing on classic albums like Innervisions and Talking Book. Later in the decade, he headed the group Raydio, and released three quality LPs while racking up several top 10 hits, including "Jack and Jill" and "A Woman Needs Love (Just Like You Do)." He release solo albums in the early '80s, topping the R&B charts with The Other Woman in 1982. "Ghostbusters" hit the scene two years later, which became a gigantic crossover hit and made Ray Parker Jr. a household name. Unfortunately, the song was extremely similar to Huey Lewis' single "I Want A New Drug," which led to a lawsuit and out-of-court payoff. He continued to record throughout the '80s but the well of hits had dried up. In 2006 he returned with a new album, I'm Free.