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Soul II Soul

About Soul II Soul

In the late 1980s, amidst other radio favorites such as Tone Loc and MC Hammer, the sound of Soul II Soul signaled the welcome return of Soul music. The London group came together as a musical collective that managed to integrate Funk, fashion and messages of peace, scoring big with "Keep on Movin" and "Back to Life." Dependent on the interplay between Caron Wheeler's sublimely soulful vocals and Jazzie B's cool, deadpan raps, the group was a combination of big, bass-heavy, low-key Funk/Jazz and grand orchestration. Producer Nellee Hooper was an integral force as well, providing the group with a polished, definable sound he would later incorporate into the work of Massive Attack and Bjork. After Hooper's departure in 1990, the group was unable to capture either the public or underground's attention with subsequent recordings, although their first two releases remain coveted by dancefloor fans.

Listen toSoul II Soulon Rhapsody

In the late 1980s, amidst other radio favorites such as Tone Loc and MC Hammer, the sound of Soul II Soul signaled the welcome return of Soul music. The London group came together as a musical collective that managed to integrate Funk, fashion and messages of peace, scoring big with "Keep on Movin" and "Back to Life." Dependent on the interplay between Caron Wheeler's sublimely soulful vocals and Jazzie B's cool, deadpan raps, the group was a combination of big, bass-heavy, low-key Funk/Jazz and grand orchestration. Producer Nellee Hooper was an integral force as well, providing the group with a polished, definable sound he would later incorporate into the work of Massive Attack and Bjork. After Hooper's departure in 1990, the group was unable to capture either the public or underground's attention with subsequent recordings, although their first two releases remain coveted by dancefloor fans.

About Soul II Soul

In the late 1980s, amidst other radio favorites such as Tone Loc and MC Hammer, the sound of Soul II Soul signaled the welcome return of Soul music. The London group came together as a musical collective that managed to integrate Funk, fashion and messages of peace, scoring big with "Keep on Movin" and "Back to Life." Dependent on the interplay between Caron Wheeler's sublimely soulful vocals and Jazzie B's cool, deadpan raps, the group was a combination of big, bass-heavy, low-key Funk/Jazz and grand orchestration. Producer Nellee Hooper was an integral force as well, providing the group with a polished, definable sound he would later incorporate into the work of Massive Attack and Bjork. After Hooper's departure in 1990, the group was unable to capture either the public or underground's attention with subsequent recordings, although their first two releases remain coveted by dancefloor fans.

About Soul II Soul

In the late 1980s, amidst other radio favorites such as Tone Loc and MC Hammer, the sound of Soul II Soul signaled the welcome return of Soul music. The London group came together as a musical collective that managed to integrate Funk, fashion and messages of peace, scoring big with "Keep on Movin" and "Back to Life." Dependent on the interplay between Caron Wheeler's sublimely soulful vocals and Jazzie B's cool, deadpan raps, the group was a combination of big, bass-heavy, low-key Funk/Jazz and grand orchestration. Producer Nellee Hooper was an integral force as well, providing the group with a polished, definable sound he would later incorporate into the work of Massive Attack and Bjork. After Hooper's departure in 1990, the group was unable to capture either the public or underground's attention with subsequent recordings, although their first two releases remain coveted by dancefloor fans.