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The Best Of Two Worlds

by Stan Getz

The Best Of Two Worlds by Stan Getz

Listen to

The Best Of Two Worlds

by Stan Getz

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Released:
Label: Columbia
At the same time disco was taking the world by storm, Stan Getz and Joao Gilberto got back together for the first time in a decade and cut this wonderful bossa nova disc. Nine of the 10 tunes are from the pen of Tom Jobim, who was so hurt by the shabby English translations of his songs in the 1960s that he wrote his own translations here (and worked with the lyricist Gene Lees). Jobim doesn't appear on the album, but Oscar Castro-Neves wrote the Jobim-like arrangements while Albert Dailey plays very Jobim-style piano parts. The album's natural and warm bossa nova sound was so tied to the 1960s that it ensured that this was ignored in the polyester-mad '70s. Today, the record sounds timeless.

About This Album

At the same time disco was taking the world by storm, Stan Getz and Joao Gilberto got back together for the first time in a decade and cut this wonderful bossa nova disc. Nine of the 10 tunes are from the pen of Tom Jobim, who was so hurt by the shabby English translations of his songs in the 1960s that he wrote his own translations here (and worked with the lyricist Gene Lees). Jobim doesn't appear on the album, but Oscar Castro-Neves wrote the Jobim-like arrangements while Albert Dailey plays very Jobim-style piano parts. The album's natural and warm bossa nova sound was so tied to the 1960s that it ensured that this was ignored in the polyester-mad '70s. Today, the record sounds timeless.

Songs

About This Album

At the same time disco was taking the world by storm, Stan Getz and Joao Gilberto got back together for the first time in a decade and cut this wonderful bossa nova disc. Nine of the 10 tunes are from the pen of Tom Jobim, who was so hurt by the shabby English translations of his songs in the 1960s that he wrote his own translations here (and worked with the lyricist Gene Lees). Jobim doesn't appear on the album, but Oscar Castro-Neves wrote the Jobim-like arrangements while Albert Dailey plays very Jobim-style piano parts. The album's natural and warm bossa nova sound was so tied to the 1960s that it ensured that this was ignored in the polyester-mad '70s. Today, the record sounds timeless.