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Macon City Auditorium: Macon, GA 2/11/72

by The Allman Brothers Band

Macon City Auditorium: Macon, GA 2/11/72 by The Allman Brothers Band

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Macon City Auditorium: Macon, GA 2/11/72

by The Allman Brothers Band

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Released:
Label: Allman Brothers Band Recording
When Brother Duane died in October of 1971, his fellow Allmans did the only thing they could do: keep on jamming. Recorded less than four months afterward, this live set from their hometown of Macon, Georgia, captures the ensemble shifting from the fiery, cosmic boogie of At Fillmore East to the more pastoral and meditative country-rock that would emerge on Eat a Peach (released the following day, as a matter of fact). Nevertheless, the group still "bring it," especially during "Whipping Post," on which Dicky Betts' guitar strives so hard to fill the gaping hole Duane left behind.

About This Album

When Brother Duane died in October of 1971, his fellow Allmans did the only thing they could do: keep on jamming. Recorded less than four months afterward, this live set from their hometown of Macon, Georgia, captures the ensemble shifting from the fiery, cosmic boogie of At Fillmore East to the more pastoral and meditative country-rock that would emerge on Eat a Peach (released the following day, as a matter of fact). Nevertheless, the group still "bring it," especially during "Whipping Post," on which Dicky Betts' guitar strives so hard to fill the gaping hole Duane left behind.

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About This Album

When Brother Duane died in October of 1971, his fellow Allmans did the only thing they could do: keep on jamming. Recorded less than four months afterward, this live set from their hometown of Macon, Georgia, captures the ensemble shifting from the fiery, cosmic boogie of At Fillmore East to the more pastoral and meditative country-rock that would emerge on Eat a Peach (released the following day, as a matter of fact). Nevertheless, the group still "bring it," especially during "Whipping Post," on which Dicky Betts' guitar strives so hard to fill the gaping hole Duane left behind.