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You're Through Fooling Me

by Various Artists

The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams by Various Artists

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You're Through Fooling Me

by Various Artists

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Released:
Label: EGYPTIAN/COLUMBIA
When Hank Williams died in 1953, he left behind notebooks filled with lyrics to over 60 songs. In 2002, Bob Dylan was approached to finish these songs, and he, in turn, enlisted help. Nearly a decade later, The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams is released. There are a number of sad waltzes here -- including Alan Jackson's wistful "You've Been Lonesome, Too," Levon Helm's forlorn "You'll Never Again Be Mine" and Norah Jones' hushed "How Many Times Have You Broken My Heart." Patty Loveless turns in the most authentic-sounding offering, while Jakob Dylan's "Oh Mama, Come Home" gets a warm, contemporary spin.

About This Album

When Hank Williams died in 1953, he left behind notebooks filled with lyrics to over 60 songs. In 2002, Bob Dylan was approached to finish these songs, and he, in turn, enlisted help. Nearly a decade later, The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams is released. There are a number of sad waltzes here -- including Alan Jackson's wistful "You've Been Lonesome, Too," Levon Helm's forlorn "You'll Never Again Be Mine" and Norah Jones' hushed "How Many Times Have You Broken My Heart." Patty Loveless turns in the most authentic-sounding offering, while Jakob Dylan's "Oh Mama, Come Home" gets a warm, contemporary spin.

Songs

About This Album

When Hank Williams died in 1953, he left behind notebooks filled with lyrics to over 60 songs. In 2002, Bob Dylan was approached to finish these songs, and he, in turn, enlisted help. Nearly a decade later, The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams is released. There are a number of sad waltzes here -- including Alan Jackson's wistful "You've Been Lonesome, Too," Levon Helm's forlorn "You'll Never Again Be Mine" and Norah Jones' hushed "How Many Times Have You Broken My Heart." Patty Loveless turns in the most authentic-sounding offering, while Jakob Dylan's "Oh Mama, Come Home" gets a warm, contemporary spin.