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Impossible Truth

by William Tyler

Impossible Truth by William Tyler

Listen to

Impossible Truth

by William Tyler

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Released:
Label: Merge Records
With his second full-length, William Tyler further establishes himself as a striking new voice in instrumental guitar and progressive folk. John Fahey is, of course, a touchstone, but that's a no-brainer (like citing Bill Monroe when reviewing a bluegrass album). What distinguishes Tyler is his knack for shimmering sweetness and delicately plucked runs that dissolve into ambient haze; they're qualities that really come out on both "The Geography of Nowhere" and, later on, "The Last Residents of Westfall." He also employs touches of pedal steel that have a distinctly early-'70s feel.

About This Album

With his second full-length, William Tyler further establishes himself as a striking new voice in instrumental guitar and progressive folk. John Fahey is, of course, a touchstone, but that's a no-brainer (like citing Bill Monroe when reviewing a bluegrass album). What distinguishes Tyler is his knack for shimmering sweetness and delicately plucked runs that dissolve into ambient haze; they're qualities that really come out on both "The Geography of Nowhere" and, later on, "The Last Residents of Westfall." He also employs touches of pedal steel that have a distinctly early-'70s feel.

Tracks

About This Album

With his second full-length, William Tyler further establishes himself as a striking new voice in instrumental guitar and progressive folk. John Fahey is, of course, a touchstone, but that's a no-brainer (like citing Bill Monroe when reviewing a bluegrass album). What distinguishes Tyler is his knack for shimmering sweetness and delicately plucked runs that dissolve into ambient haze; they're qualities that really come out on both "The Geography of Nowhere" and, later on, "The Last Residents of Westfall." He also employs touches of pedal steel that have a distinctly early-'70s feel.