Modern Christian Punk

Christian punk seems like the ultimate oxymoron; after all, how could a musical genre with its roots in anti-authority and the counterculture align itself with the rigidity of religion? But the modern wave of punk and emo actually features a large number of bands with spiritual ties -- though there's really no current equivalent of Stryper damning the devil to hell or Creed waving arms wide open. Instead, a good deal of these acts operate the same way bands like U2 have, using spirituality and religion as a lens rather than transforming their music into a worship tool. Sure, you'll still find bands like Relient K, Owl City and The Almost (featuring former Underoath drummer Aaron Gillespie, who ...Expand ยป

Christian punk seems like the ultimate oxymoron; after all, how could a musical genre with its roots in anti-authority and the counterculture align itself with the rigidity of religion? But the modern wave of punk and emo actually features a large number of bands with spiritual ties -- though there's really no current equivalent of Stryper damning the devil to hell or Creed waving arms wide open. Instead, a good deal of these acts operate the same way bands like U2 have, using spirituality and religion as a lens rather than transforming their music into a worship tool. Sure, you'll still find bands like Relient K, Owl City and The Almost (featuring former Underoath drummer Aaron Gillespie, who himself released a straight-up worship album) that openly praise, but the acts that are far more interesting (see: mewithoutYou, Manchester Orchestra, Thrice) use their faith as a way to navigate the very constructs of life, morality and even skepticism and doubt. Even more fun are the heavy bands like Norma Jean and The Devil Wears Prada; we're not entirely sure what these guys are even saying half the time, but you just have to assume some of it is pointed skyward.

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