Radio: Big Hair

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by Chuck Eddy

From the beginning, Rhapsody's Big Hair Radio has been defined as "loud rawk, big riffs, tight pants and lots of groupies," and even if you've never understood why somebody would spell "rock" that way (is it supposed to be a Midwestern accent?), it ought to be perfectly clear what our description is getting at. Obviously, hair metal in its 1984-to-1990 MTV-ruling prime is the main game in town: everything from Ratt and Twisted Sister and Quiet Riot to Mr. Big and Slaughter and Read more »

From the beginning, Rhapsody's Big Hair Radio has been defined as "loud rawk, big riffs, tight pants and lots of groupies," and even if you've never understood why somebody would spell "rock" that way (is it supposed to be a Midwestern accent?), it ought to be perfectly clear what our description is getting at. Obviously, hair metal in its 1984-to-1990 MTV-ruling prime is the main game in town: everything from Ratt and Twisted Sister and Quiet Riot to Mr. Big and Slaughter and Extreme, with plenty of Guns N' Roses/Faster Pussycat/Mötley Crüe/Cinderella sleaze (and select moments of Bon Jovi sentimentality) in between.

But you'll also hear lots of the mid-'70s glam (KISS, Aerosmith, New York Dolls, Alice Cooper, T. Rex) and late '70s/early '80s hard rock (Runaways, Cheap Trick, Van Halen, Alcatrazz, Aldo Nova) that made hair metal possible in the first place. And we've even sprinkled in a handful of cuts by more recent headbangers who have big '80s hair running through their genes, and in some cases, big '80s cucumbers running through their jeans: bands like Buckcherry, Steel Panther, Silvertide, Beautiful Creatures, The Last Vegas and Cauldron. What all this Spandexed, Aqua Netted and Max Factored rocking adds up to, in the immortal words of Poison, is nothin' but a good time. It don't get better than this.

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