The Inbox: Queens of the Stone Age, LeAnn Rimes and More

Welcome to The Inbox, a recurring feature in which we take a spin through the week's hottest new releases (along with a bit of Rhapsody's own reviews) and pair each album with the weirdest, coolest, (sometimes unintentionally) funniest stuff we can find on the Internet. Enjoy.

A Banquet of Arty, Breathtaking Hard Rock Viciousness on Par with Game of Thrones' Jaw-Dropping "Red Wedding":

Queens of the Stone Age, ... Like Clockwork
Queens of the Stone Age have always possessed an art-rock streak, but on ... Like Clockwork it dominates the band's vision… But along with said artiness comes brooding paranoia that seems to have seeped into nearly every one of the album's 10 cuts. [Justin Farrar]

More Pulverizing (or Semi-Pulverizing) Metal Jams from the World's Hardest-Rocking Mini-Horse Enthusiast:

Megadeth, Super Collider
Not until after the classic-rock-lush intro of "Don't Turn Your Back," the 10th of 11 cuts, does Megadeth's 14th album opt for all-out thrashing. Momentum's in short supply, and Dave Mustaine's vocals sound increasingly strained -- senior citizen-era Alice Cooper comes to mind. Still, there are moments. [Chuck Eddy]

Vibrant Australian Pop Jams for Folks Who Find a Photo of a Tiny Baby Koala Bottle-Feeding While Sitting in a Coffee Cup Insufficiently Adorable:

Lenka, Shadows
Lenka has made a career of being the cutest thing out of Australia since a baby wallaby, but Shadows considerably ups the cutesy-wutesiness. Malt-shop sweetness, cooing vocals, picnic-in-the-park guitars, adorable nature metaphors, (hobby-)horse-with-no-name castanets -- and that's just "After the Winter." But the whole thing is the aural equivalent of one milkshake, two straws. [Rachel Devitt]

Fiery, Future-Minded Jazz Excursions for Fans of Both Blistering Trumpet Action and Awesome Upright-Bass Faces:

Terence Blanchard, Magnetic
The trumpeter-bandleader returns to Blue Note after an eight-year absence, during which he mostly worked as a film composer. His sophistication shows throughout: The gentle electronic effects (as on "Hallucinations") sit well with the burning post-bop playing ("Don't Run" features hot licks from Blanchard's trumpet as well as from Ravi Coltrane's tenor sax). [Seth Colter Walls]

More Blurry, Industrial-Sized Rage to Both Thrill and Antagonize Beavis & Butthead:

Filter, The Sun Comes Out Tonight
Lyrically speaking, Filter are still angry dudes. On opener "We Hate It When You Get What You Want," for example, the band emphatically chants "Sit yourself down, motherf*cker!" On the other hand, the tune's music tells a different story: A mix of dance beats and synth squiggles, it betrays the fact that the act is nowadays more interested in creating club music than the industrial rock of the "Hey Man Nice Shot" years. [Justin Farrar]

A Star-Studded Southern Gothic Musical for All Those Who Wish That O Brother, Where Art Thou? Boasted a Higher Body Count:

Various Artists, Ghost Brothers of Darkland County
A collaboration between Stephen King, John Mellencamp and T-Bone Burnett, Ghost Brothers of Darkland County is an Americana musical soaked in murder, familial tragedy and Southern rural weirdness … the recorded version takes a different approach, opting instead to tap the talents of a host of musicians, including Elvis Costello, Neko Case, Rosanne Cash, Kris Kristofferson and Sheryl Crow. [Justin Farrar]

Venom-and-Regret Country Jammers from Yet Another Country Chick Who Could Beat Me Up:

LeAnn Rimes, Spitfire
On Spitfire's "Kerosene"-like barn-burning opener, Rimes is decisive, offering to use her tongue like a whip while her subject runs, but as the album unfolds it reveals a singer more conflicted. On tracks like "What Have I Done," that hate turns to regret and on "Where I Stood," doubt. [Nick Murray]

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